Tuesday, July 25, 2006

A most enjoyable stitch

I usually rely on the good ol' seed stitch when it comes to knitting winter scarves -- sometimes adding a section of ribbing in the middle so it molds nicely around the neck. Nothing wrong with it, but I felt (gasp!!!!!) a bit of rut coming on.

Then last week, I was visiting a new yarn shop. I saw a great scarf on display with handwritten instructions for the very simple stitch pattern pinned to it. As the friendly clerk was ringing up my yarn purchases, I asked if I could copy down the pattern, and she cheerfully encouraged me to do just that.

It's been too hot to work with the handspun wool I bought that day, so I tried out the new stitch on some of the Caron Simply Soft I seem to have in abundance. I started fiddling around and changing the pattern a little -- and came up with something that instantly pulled me out of my seed-stitch rut. It's good-looking, reversible, and knits up in a flash! I've only done a few inches so far, but I think it'll be perfect for next January's Red Scarf project.





I'm sure there's a name for this stitch somewhere - surely Barbara Walker has long since documented this one - but I couldn't find the official name for it, so I will simply refer to it as the Enjoyable Rib stitch:

***

Enjoyable-Rib Scarf

Cast on 38 stitches on size 8 needles (or any multiple of four, plus 2 for edge stitches, using any size needle that suits your yarn.)

Slip first stitch; *K1, K2tog, YO, P1* till one stitch remains - K last stitch.

That's it. Repeat that same row, over and over, always being careful to slip the first stitch of each row. Keep going for 60 inches or so, and bind off in pattern.

***

My photo doesn't do the stitch justice - in a yarn with a little bit of sheen, the rib columns stand out beautifully and no one will ever believe it's so wildly simple to do. Have fun with this -- I promise you'll find it very enjoyable, too!

14 comments:

Yarn Collectors Anonymous said...

Do you recall what size yarn you used for this pattern and the yards needed? Very pretty and would like to use your patter, just want to be sure I have enough yarn.
you may em me radhouse (at) mindspring (dot) com.

Many thanks!!

Diane said...

Thank you for sharing! I'm going to give it a try!

Anonymous said...

I think that stitch is called a Turkish stitch or a purse stitch. It's one I found on a knitted string shopping bag pattern.

Zuleika said...

I'm a little confused...when I do a YO with a purl after, I end up with a twist in the yarn, like two "C"s back-to-back. Do I count that as two stitches or one?

kimberly said...

I really like sewing because i can create every thing like a skirt, blouse, pants or dresses and desing my own style. When i am sewing i usually feel my imagination flies. I think i am appationated about this.

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katty said...

I really like sewing in my free time and I really enjoy this practice, when I get my house through costa rica homes for sale I knew it would many space in my house like to take a room as a workshop. And now I usually invite my friend to sewing in the afternoon. We spend a funny time creating new things.

As the Whorl Turns said...

I placed a link to you blog on mine. I so enjoyed making a scarf with this stitch. Thank you very much for sharing this stitch! I really enjoyed it & will use this stitch again many times over I am thinking!!

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